Posts Tagged ‘anxiety’

Holiday Hassles

July 26, 2010

So the school holidays have now started, and it feels like us adults also deserve a holiday. In offices all around the country, people are taking off on their annual break, where work becomes a distant memory, while colleagues jealously wait for their turn in the sun. However, I read an interesting article in the Daily Mail the other day – all about holidays and anxiety – which suggests that this holiday dream is not a reality.  According to the article, nearly half of managers claim a holiday leaves them feeling ‘more anxious’ than before they left the office, according to a survey from the Institute of Leadership and Management, which polled nearly 2500 managers.

So what is causing this problem? Why can we not relax when we are on holiday? Well first of all, more and more workers are taking devices like the BlackBerry and iPhone away with them, meaning they never switch off from the office and their onslaught of emails. Of the third of those polled who work while on holiday, 80 per cent ‘frequently’ respond to emails, nearly 50 per cent take phone calls and 10 per cent go into the office.  More than two-thirds of people who own a BlackBerry or a smart-phone say they check it ‘at least once a day, if not more’. A shocking 40% of all managers told researchers that they return to work feeling ‘more anxious’ than before they left especially because of the number of emails they will face on their return.

Professor Cary Cooper, from the Lancaster University Management School, said the problem has been worsened because employees are so worried about losing their job that they are falling victim to the culture of ‘presenteeism’. This involves arriving early and staying late, as well as staying in touch while on holiday as a way of showing commitment to your employer.

Around 40 per cent of managers are already working more than 50 hours a week, while around 10 per cent do more than 60 hours.

So what are some recommended tips to reduce anxiety on your holiday? If you have to check emails, limit this checking to once per day. Other tips are to inform key contacts that you are away in order to cut down the number of messages you will receive on your return, and leave a clear plan for your absence so that colleagues can get things done before your return. 

However, we would say that there is more to do than that, to make sure you enjoy your holiday and are relaxed and refreshed when you return. In this situation, people are anxious when returning to work, because they are expecting the worst. But 99% of the time anxiety is based on assumptions. So we would say just make sure that you get everything sorted out as much as possible before you go, and then be confident in your ability that you have done everything that you need to do, and what you haven’t done can wait until your return.

Let us know how that works for you!

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Excercise your anxiety or depression away

April 30, 2010

So we are nearing the weekend. The time when you might be tempted to overindulge – maybe get that takeaway on Friday night, or just sleep in until really late on Sunday. But if you suffer from anxiety, you might want to consider doing something a little more active in your weekend.

 You see exercise can be a really good way to combat anxiety and depression, and many other trials of life, and is something we really recommend at the Mind Clinic.

According to this article, last year the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) published its guidelines on the treatment and management of depression in adults – and recommended exercise. Nice examined research on treating depression with everything from water aerobics and ballroom dancing to running and walking. The conclusion was that an exercise regime of about 45 minutes to 1 hour, two to three times a week, has a beneficial effect and could be considered a good alternative to antidepressants.

So exercise is a good way to combat anxiety without the use of drugs, which is something we would really encourage at the Mind Clinic. With exercise, you can use the power of your mind to understand and harness any negative feelings.

But this doesn’t mean that you need to slave away at the gym. It is about getting active, and even a little bit of exercise, going out for a walk for example, as often as you can, can really help. There are also other things that you could consider such as the ‘green gym’. This ‘gym’ involves tutored groups taking part in nature conservation work such as pruning, planting and coppicing.  

The good thing is that excercising in this way is not just a short term fix either. Data pooled from many small studies suggest that in people diagnosed with depression or anxiety, the immediate mood boost is followed by longer-term relief.

Yoga is another exercise that can work particularly well. Yoga can help you to achieve physical fitness as well as mental wellness. Since ancient times, yoga has played a significant role in achieving better mind, body and soul.

 So next time you experience any negative feelings, it might be worth thinking about what you could do to get more active.

The Baby Blues

March 26, 2010

I don’t really like the term ‘baby blues’ because it seems like a very trivial term for a very important issue  – that of postnatal depression.

It is a very common condition, which both Angelina Jolie and Gwyneth Paltrow battled with. In fact, it is a term that is often banded about, but what exactly is it?

Well, according to this blogAngelina Jolie was on the verge of postnatal depression after the birth of her twins, Vivienne Marcheline and Knox Leon, in September 2008.

Common symptoms of PND include sadness, anxiety, lethargy, mood swings, tearfulness, and problems eating and sleeping. It is thought that as many as 80% of women experience PND in some form or another following pregnancy.

 In 2006, Gwyneth Paltrow suffered from PND after giving birth to her second child, Moses. This was not the first time Gwyneth suffered from depression. In 2002, her terminally ill father passed away, and she experienced guilt at not having done enough for her father while he was sick.

This brings me onto a wider issue about dealing with depression –  according to a BBC news article, GPs are calling for better treatment for depression sufferers.

65% of doctors say they can “rarely” offer psychological therapy to depression sufferers within two months of referral. The survey is part of a campaign by mental health charity Mind calling for better access to therapies.

The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommends talking therapies to help with mild and moderate depression.

 Mind’s campaign challenges all political parties to make a guarantee in their election manifestos, to offer evidence-based therapies to all those who need them within 28 days of requesting referral.  Mind Chief Executive Paul Farmer said talking therapies could save lives, and it was crucial that people who needed help received it as quickly as possible.

 The programme director for Wellbeing at the London School of Economics, Professor Lord Layard, who is spearheading the campaign, has stressed the economic case for depression therapy, suggesting that successful therapy can help many people return to the workplace.

 So what do we think here at the Mind Clinic? Well, we support the need for faster counselling for depression and believe that these alternative therapies should be available on the NHS. However, we do not consider depression a mental health issue.  We believe that the most important therapy is understanding depression, and understanding yourself, and that this produces far greater benefits than accepting current perceptions about depression. At the Mind Clinic, we believe that depression is an important part of human nature.  A depression marks the end of a specific cycle in our life and the beginning of a new cycle that is waiting to arrive.

 What do we do about depression? At the Mind Clinic,  we teach through guidance and counselling how to consider depression useful rather than destructive. It is all about helping you to help yourself by understanding better your emotions. As every one of us is unique, every depression is unique but the mechanics of any depression are the same. If medication is being used, we work on a medication reduction programme (in conjunction with medical care).

So at the Mind Clinic we do support this campaign, so people receive therapies more quickly, for any kind of depression, from PND to post traumatic stress disorder. The most important thing though is to gain an understanding of your depression, and therefore regain your sense of wellbeing.

 
   

The Master and the Servant

February 18, 2010

It is our own personal choice whether we seek empowerment from our mind or not.

At some point in life there will be a desire to know who we are, and why we are.

It is by utilising our mind that we discover our true natural abilities, all of which are vital to our presence in this physical world.

The minds duty is to ensure the preservation of the self. The mind is geared to heal the self and has the power to create that balance to sustain us.Our mind is influenced by our emotional needs, requests and demands, as well as our wishes. It is the minds duty to accept our instructions and react accordingly.

Therefore, it is imperative that our instructions to the self are appropriate, to create the desired influence.

The number one enemy to the mind is fear and anxiety. The mind takes control of the body and allows it to behave according to the fears present. Naturally, the manifestation of fears creates limitations and restrictions.

When emotions dominate they create weakness. Our weaknesses become exaggerated according to our imagination, which create an altered state of mind; this is where an unnatural behaviour ensues.

In simple terms, if we express sadness our mind will make us cry.  If we think we are tired our mind will shut our body down. All suggestions work in the same fashion, no matter how insignificant.

Naturally, the outcome of any suggestion is magnified depending on our imagination. The deeper the imagination the more severe the outcome.

It is through our mind that we see and experience. It is through our mind that we create.  It is through our mind that we evolve.