Posts Tagged ‘willpower’

Self Discipline and Willpower

July 12, 2010

 Willpower is based on emotion. Discipline is based on the mind. Self-discipline and willpower must work in balance.

 Discipline is based on a natural action. We can discipline ourselves to sleep and wake up at a certain hour, discipline our mind to work in our sleep and discipline our mind to be active in our waking hours.

Discipline allows us to exercise our abilities where anything becomes possible.

When we have the discipline to have an open mind, we learn to observe the activity of our mind and to be mindful of the energy that is created, activity not only of our mind but also our brain and our body. 

 When discipline is achieved it becomes a habit. A habit of this nature allows us opportunity, a self-control that is vital to our existence.

Our willpower is our ultimate drive and applies to the physical world.

Of course we need to apply our willpower, which shall see us through all our experiences. When we exercise our willpower we change and become elevated.  

When our will is weak, we are susceptible and vulnerable, a vulnerability that comes from within, as if we intend to victimise ourselves and allow the self to deviate.  At times like this, we become stagnant in thought and develop a disinterest or discontentment towards all that surrounds us, which can manifest into guilt.

Objectively focusing on our mind enables us to learn about our self, our motivation, desire and the magnetism towards our willpower.  

We can develop our willpower by identifying and observing basic functions that make us do things for ourselves.  

The will to breathe is our starting point.  We can enhance our willpower by breathing objectively, meaning paying attention to the air that we breathe in and the air that we breathe out. 

When we are focused on parts of our body and breathe air into them they come alive, either relaxing or activating, you are paying attention to strengthen. When we breathe life into our actions our willpower strengthens. 

The deeper we breathe the calmer we become and the stronger we become. Exercising our willpower allows us to achieve the ultimate in all that we do.

When you breathe objectively, observe to see if your willpower changes. 

The application of willpower for us to achieve our objectives is extremely important.  It is our own effort, our own need, and our own drive. 

This willpower has to be directed towards our mind, instructing our mind  to behave and to create the necessary instructions to the brain to make us achieve our desires.

Applying our willpower together with our discipline allows us to communicate the changes that are needed. When our willpower and discipline is at its strongest, the mind reacts in such a way that creates change instantaneously.

How to deal with work depression

April 19, 2010

Read this interesting article about dealing with work depression, and I thought I would share some of it with you.

The word ‘depression’ especially when associated with work is often considered something of a taboo subject – you don’t even want to admit to being depressed in case it impacts on your future job prospects.

Here are some suggested techniques to manage that depression about your work:

  • Consider if you really need to leave your job, without a new job to go to, or whether you can use the power of your mind and the hints below to overcome your depression. Why? Not working may add to your depression because of the acute anxiety you feel when you think about how you are going to pay off your next phone, electric, and mortgage bill without a regular salary.
  • Relaxation techniques? When you feel yourself getting stressed at work, or the amount of work you have left to do threatens to overwhelm you, make sure you relax your shoulders to relieve some of that tension. Take deep breaths: counting to four as you inhale and to four again as you exhale.
  • Commit to some time (at the very least the weekends) where you don’t check your emails. In a recent survey commissioned by Support.com 40 percent of 18- to 25-year-olds said they couldn’t cope without their cell phone, yet the same students reported less stress when they stopped using them for three days.
  •  Consider making your office environment, whether it is at home or in the office, a nicer place  to work. If at all possible, it is important to have access to natural light. You could also try putting a nice plant on your desk, or some personal photos (a recent study says that looking at pictures of loved ones reduced pain).  And I know it is easier said than done, but keeping your desk clean and tidy will really help too
  • Make sure you take holidays from work. Now that is a good recommendation! And it doesn’t mean you need to take expensive holidays abroad, you can even just stay at home and enjoy pottering in the garden or going for walks in the countryside. The important thing is to have that break from work. Vacations protect us from job burnout. Often times we emerge from a break with a new perspective that can help us navigate through the maze of impending deadlines. At the Mind Clinic, we can help you use the power of your mind, your own willpower, to overcome depression. Here at the Mind Clinic we say, you should not feel worried or guilty for feeling depressed about work. Depression is a normal cycle in human nature.

     Rather than worry about the label ‘depression at work’ you should understand it. We teach about depression through a combination of guidance and counselling. Unlike what it is perceived to be, depression is not a mental illness. Depression is a situation where balance needs to be restored to your emotions.

     So we would say that if you are feeling depressed at work, the first thing is to understand what your depression is, and why you are feeling it. Then you can use the power of your mind, and the steps above, to overcome it.

The Mind’s duty

March 1, 2010

Throughout time the mind has been portrayed as something of a trickster. We blame the mind for our pitfalls and misbehaviour, as if it’s playing games with us. Yet on the other hand, we make positive statements about the mind and profess to its power.

We have the ability of thought and the power of will.  We make our own decisions and choose our own path.  Yet, it is the path of our “mind” that we should really be following.

The mind behaves in the most natural way.  The mind’s sensitivity, communication and knowledge are in tune with nature. We are a part of nature. We function within the laws of nature. Our mind is there to serve a purpose in its environment.  The control of our emotions and the understanding of our mind are central to avoiding our destructive nature.

The duty of the mind is to create the necessary reaction towards all issues that we encounter in our daily life for us to progress. The mind contains our ultimate source of knowledge where moment-by-moment experiences are recorded and stored. Our creativity, imagination, and source of power derive from the mind.

Our natural process is to use our imagination to create, based on the knowledge that the mind has accumulated.

The mind controls our instinct, which in its deepest form is the mechanics of our brain and body. We do not think how to see, but we see. We do not think how we move our limbs, but we move them.  This same process continues in everything that we do, as a matter of course.

We are also given a willpower that can influence the mind to create what is needed to fulfil the stages of our journey.  The mind holds the power and is the creator of all that we are and all that we do.  By utilising the power and strength of our mind we are able to achieve all our objectives.